The Ichthyosis Board
  General Discussion
  "Renew" cream?

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search

UBBFriend: Email This Page to Someone! next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   "Renew" cream?
CShell
Member

Posts: 1135
From:Fort Meade, MD
Registered: Nov 2005

posted August 11, 2006 10:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for CShell   Click Here to Email CShell     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Anyone happen to know the ingredients in it? My friend sent me some, and it doesn't list the ingredients on the package, and it has an 800 number to call to get them...I'll give them a call on Monday, but was wondering if anyone knew if it contained lac-hydrins or acids or anything of the sort that people with Netherton's should avoid?

IP: Logged

gryphon
Member

Posts: 298
From:Alberta, Canada
Registered: Apr 2006

posted August 12, 2006 11:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for gryphon   Click Here to Email gryphon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As the word “renew” is too common a word in relation to creams it is impossible to isolate a site online that lists the ingredients of your sample. However just by the word ‘renew’ I can *assume * that it will not be suitable for Julia. ‘Renew’ usually implies that the lotion will remove the dull outer surface on the skin exposing a more supple skin underneath. To affect this renewal of the skin’s surface quite often either AHA’s (glycolic acid or lactic acid, sometimes combined with these less common topical AHA’s namely malic acid, citric acid, mandelic acid, and tartaric acid.), BHA’s (salicylic acid), or urea are used. I expect that you would have been told to avoid all of these because they are added to lotions to exfoliate skin and are thus unsuitable for thin skin (even on my face I use very low concentrations).

Less common acid ingredients used to control skin keratinisation are polyhydroxy acids (PHAs) and aldobionic acids (ABAs). Many lotions that say that they use a so-called “acid-complex” like Neostrata for example include these acids. They too are used for exfoliation so may be unsuitable for thin skin.

I have a lot of accumulated info on acids in lotion so I’ll ramble a bit here because Julia, as she grows older and expands her lotion use, will see other acids as ingredients. Not all acids are used to exfoliate so you can’t assume they are unsafe for NS so you should check with a good dermatologist whether it can be used safely for NS.

There are acids used in lotions as for antioxidant properties. Vit C (L-ascorbic acid) and alpha-lipoic acid (ALA’s) are often in cosmetic anti-aging creams as well as higher end body creams. They are not used for exfoliation per se but rather serve to protect the skin from damage and to keep a youthful appearance. Vit C also promotes the production of collagen, elastin as well as the strength and elasticity of the skin. Good moisturizers use it for that purpose. Alpha-lipoic acid is fairly common in face creams available at specialty cosmetic counters (ie. Sheseido, Bio-therm etc.). It is an excellent anti-oxidant (free-radical protector) and is often used together with Vit C in good facial lotions. I would think that these properties would be good for NS so I would really check with your derm whether Vit C (L-ascorbic acid) and particularly ALA’s in creams is safe for Julia. Also where you’ll probably run into L-ascorbic (Vit C) most often is in SPF sun-screen lotions. BTW the ABA’s and PHA’s I mentioned earlier are used in some suncreens as they are also effective in preventing oxidative damage from UVA/UVB radiation so yet another reason to perhaps check with a derm whether they’re safe. BTW, Vit E (Tocotrienol) is sometimes included in these anti-oxidizing creams but it isn’t an acid as far as I know.

Retinoic acids (a Vit A derivative) are also found in some creams. They are dealt with in the Retinoids section on this BB. But in lower concentrations you will find it in a many anti-aging creams (under the names Retinol/Pro-Retinol, Retinyl Actate, Retinyl Palmitate). But the reason I bring it up is b/c it is also in acne preparations (may be an issue as Jules gets into her teens). In acne creams you’ll also find kojic acid and azelaic acid (by prescription). In normal moisturizing creams if you see kojic or azelaic acids in your lotions you’ll want to confirm with a derm whether it is safe. Likely not as they are very harsh (used often in skin lightening creams…I come from a culture where the use of these types of creams is unfortunately all too common). Usually though they are also in specialty skin creams like Murad brand lotions and not the sort of stuff usually used in ich care. Still worth knowing as Julia gets older.

Finally there is also hyaluronic acid (a.k.a. cyclic hydroxy acid). It does have exfoliating properties but at the same time the claims about it is that it is exceptionally effective at shoring up the skin’s water barrier. You may want to check with your doctor whether it is safe to use. I just started using a lotion containing it and the claim on the packaging is that the lotion “incorporates in its formulation an exclusive high molecular weight Hyaluronic Acid Complex that provides moisture retaining, flexible, uniform "no holes" matrices capable of supporting 1000 times its molecular weight in water. This results in superior skin softening, smoothing, lubricating and elasticity”.

I’ve been keeping abreast of the acids in my skincare for 20 years now so this is basically my personal knowledge of acids I have come across in my own lotions over the years. Since the presence of acids in lotions is important to you I thought I’d mention them if you weren’t already aware of them and so that you can make specific enquiries. HTH

IP: Logged

chrischan
Member

Posts: 17
From:Shrewsbury, Massachusetts, US
Registered: Feb 2006

posted August 12, 2006 02:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for chrischan   Click Here to Email chrischan     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My co-worker just gave me her half used bottle of Renew to try on my 6 yr old son who has EHK. I'm wondering if its the same product you are asking about. She told me it's from a wellness company that uses natural ingredients. I've tried it on my hands first and I've tried it once on him to make sure there are no allergic reactions. So far he's ok and he doesn't mind the mild baby powder fragrance. I like that it doesn't feel too sticky and it did moisturize well. He says it feels ok on his skin too. I will be trying it a few more times to give it a chance as long as someone doesn't find anything in here that I should be careful about. Unfortunately it does contain the parabens that everyone has been talking about.
Here are the ingredients from the bottle: Deionized Water, Glycerin USP, Petrolatum USP, Distearyldimonium Chloride, Isopropyl Palmitate, Cetyl Alcohol, Dimethicone, Allantoin, T36-C5 Melaleuca Oil, Methylparaben, Propylparaben, Fragrance.
The bottle also has a website too.
Its www.melaleuca.com
Hope this helps.

IP: Logged

CShell
Member

Posts: 1135
From:Fort Meade, MD
Registered: Nov 2005

posted August 12, 2006 03:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for CShell   Click Here to Email CShell     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
gryphon - As always, thanks so much for your elaborate knowledge on creams! No one could claim you didn't do your research! lol Usually I stick to creams tried and true for Jules (Eucerin, Nivea, Cocoa Butter, etc) but sometimes her skin does weird things and I need to use something else, or sometimes her skin just "gets used" to a cream and I have to switch it up - that usually happens about every 2 weeks. Whenever I am buying a new cream, I look at the ingredients and just make sure it doesn't have anything that rings bells (lac-hydrins, lactic acid, etc). I read thru what you wrote, but I'll have to re-read it again when Julia isn't babbling in my lap to really understand everything you wrote, so thanks! I'm sure it'll be an invaluable resource...I haven't been given too many Stay Away Froms from our derm., just suggested to use creams that are mild and have the least amounts of ingredients.

chrischan - I think that's the cream I was sent. At the bottom of the thing (she sent me 3 sample size ones, about 1oz) it says: Melaleuca, Inc.

So gryphon - if that *is* the same cream, do any of those ingredients ring any warning bells for NS? Besides the parabens? I'm due to have a discussion with our derm. about parabens when I go up and see her next week, so for the moment I'm not going to cut them out of our routine until I have more info. But just in terms of acids and whatnot.

I happen to have dry skin as well, maybe you could call it eczema. It's sort of random, but I used it yesterday, and the spot I put it on wasn't dry anymore. I'm going to look up "renew" and Netherton's in the same google search...sometimes creams have warnings specifically for NS.

IP: Logged

gryphon
Member

Posts: 298
From:Alberta, Canada
Registered: Apr 2006

posted August 12, 2006 07:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for gryphon   Click Here to Email gryphon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well, two valuable life lessons have 'proven their mettle' today.
Life Lesson #1: "Never judge a book by its cover"

Life Lesson #2: "Assumptions can let the best in life pass you by"

I *assumed* wrong in my last post. Thanks chrischan, b/c of your info that's cleared up for CShell and I learned a new name for tea tree oil. I also had never heard of "Allantoin" before. It turns out to be an extract of the comfrey plant that is used in lotions for its healing and calming properties. Melaleuca is another name for tea-tree oil which is a well known anti-bacterial and healing oil. You all know what the first three ingredients are.

The 4th,5th,6th and 7th ingredients are very common. I keep a list of lotion ingredients and I still haven't figured out what Distearyldimonium Chloride does but it is often in lotions, liquid soaps and shampoos and isn't an "active" ingredient. Cetyl Alcohol is a stabilizer and emollient derived from coconut oil. Isopropyl Palmitate is also from coconut oil and is used to give a silky feeling to the skin. On my list of ingredients it is also called a palmic acid (b/c it comes from palm trees). The word 'acid' is of no concern b/c it is also an essential fatty acid (EFA) so shouldn't hurt thin skin, but check with your derm if you want to be sure. Dimethicone is a silicone derivative used to give the lotion a sheen.

So this "Renew" appears to be a moisturising, occlusive cream that may claim calming and healing properties. Hooda thunk it, certainly not me. But given the the tea tree oil and allantoin are towards the end of the list of ingredients it is present in small quantities, so I'm not sure how calming and healing it'll be. Still I don't use calming lotions or tea-tree skin lotions so please don't take my word that things like allantoin and melaleuca are safe.

Courtney, the AHA's I listed aren't necessarily ingredients to always stay away from. Acids are frequently used as preservatives (inactive ingredients) rather than active ingredients. For example in my lotions I have "sorbic acid" which is used as a preservative. Likewise AHA's like lactic acid and citric as well as urea, in very small quantities, can be used as preservatives. So you'll probably want to check whether AHA's as 'inactive' ingredients can be used for NS given that they are seen in small quantities in some lotions as preservatives. For example Cetaphil lotion (uses citric acid) and Cetaphil cream (uses lactic acid) contain them as inactive preservatives in my understanding. So a good way of checking that issue is to see if Cetaphil cream is safe for Julia. If an AHA or urea is the last item on the ingredients list it is not likely an active ingredient and is used as preservative.

BTW if you see "stearic acid" in your lotions it is also an inactive ingredient. Stearic acid is a EFA, from plants mostly, that is used as thickener in creams and lotions.

Hope that new cream works well if you end up using it on Jules.

[This message has been edited by gryphon (edited August 12, 2006).]

IP: Logged

gryphon
Member

Posts: 298
From:Alberta, Canada
Registered: Apr 2006

posted August 12, 2006 08:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for gryphon   Click Here to Email gryphon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not being familiar with why exactly allantoin and tea tree oil are in lotions. I decided to do a further search. Found the following excerpt on netdoctor.uk

"At higher concentrations urea, lactic acid and glycolic acid also act as keratolytics. They are used to break down a skin protein called keratin. In conditions such as chronic eczema and ichthyosis, excessive amounts of keratin cause the skin cells to harden, making the skin become thickened and scaly. Keratolytics break down the keratin in the hardened and thickened skin, helping to shed skin cells from these areas, and soften and improve the appearance of dry, scaly skin. This action also improves the ability of moisturising ingredients to penetrate the skin and rehydrate it. Allantoin is also a keratolytic."

So again I can't say for sure what the function of allantoin is in the lotion. But the quoted info does say it *can* be used for exfoliation. Wikipedia says that "keratolytic" treatment is used to "thin the skin". So probably a no-go for you

IMO you should check with the manufacturer what the concentrations are and what the function of allantoin is in the lotion. It might be a typical 'renew' lotion as I first thought.

[This message has been edited by gryphon (edited August 12, 2006).]

IP: Logged

CShell
Member

Posts: 1135
From:Fort Meade, MD
Registered: Nov 2005

posted August 14, 2006 02:04 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for CShell   Click Here to Email CShell     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hmm...I'm going to have to call. See, I thought Allantoin was some sort of aloe! lol. Good thing you posted!

MAN, why does NS have to be so complicated? lol

IP: Logged

gryphon
Member

Posts: 298
From:Alberta, Canada
Registered: Apr 2006

posted August 14, 2006 08:20 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for gryphon   Click Here to Email gryphon     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yeah, I thought it would be something like aloe as well when I read about it at first on wikipedia. Here is another page from netdoctor.uk that describes very well the function of allantoin in Aveeno creams. The third paragraph describes it. Although it soothes and heals, like aloe, it's primary function in Aveeno creams is to break down keratin and aid exfoliation.

It'll all come down to the concentration of allantoin in your cream but again, given that it is called a 'renew', I'm thinking it does exfoliate.
http://www.netdoctor.co.uk/medicines/100004785.html

IP: Logged

All times are ET (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | Ichthyosis Information

© 2000-2005 Ichthyosis Information All Rights Reserved.
The posts on these forums are copyrighted by the originator
and held by Ichthyosis Information and may not be reproduced
in any manner without permission of the originator.


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.45c

In loving memory of Emil Pfisterer